City Data partners

Participants in the London Data ecosystem are numerous and varied.  Not all of can be mentioned here, but chief among them are:

The Open Data Institute (ODI) is in the vanguard of the push to use open data to create economic, social and environmental value.  A world-class team provides training and development to spread knowledge and expertise to engage with open data.

The Smart London Board. In March 2013, the Mayor announced a top line of experts including leading academics, businesses and entrepreneurs to help advise on how London can put digital technological at the heart of making the capital an even better place to live, work and invest. From 2011 to 2021 London’s population will grow by a million – the fastest rate of acceleration ever. We are going to hit nine million before New York, and approach ten million by 2030.

With these projections, we will have at least another 641,000 jobs, and another 800,000 homes by 2031. The Smart London Board will look at the role digital technology can play in helping to address these challenges.

You can find out more about its work, membership and the Smart London plan here.

The Borough Data Partnership has been convened by the GLA.  Significant users and generators of data and delivers of services, we see real value in bringing together the London Boroughs, not least because the problems they face cross administrative boundaries.  Meeting three times a year (link to pages, agenda, presentations etc), our aim is to increase city data capacity, use data to collectively solve city issues and to push more valuable data into the ecosystem.

Future Cities Catapult (FCC) is one of seven ‘catapults’ launched by the UK’s Technology Strategy Board.  FCC’s work focusses on joining up capacity across different disciplines to solve city challenges.  The team has been helpful in generating data use, supporting our Borough Data Partnership and advising us on the broader ecosystem.

The World Council on City Data.  London is a founding member of the WCCD.  Working to the first ISO international standard on city indicators, the WCCD aims to be a global hub for creative learning and open data-led partnerships across cities, international organizations, corporate partners, and academia.

The Open Data User Group (ODUG) exists to help government understand the requirements of people who are using, or could use, the datasets it collects. Alongside the Cabinet Office and members of the community, ODUG will, on a routine basis, categorise the requests and evidence the benefits of opening up a given dataset (including the development of full business cases where required).